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One of the relaxed working spaces within the rotunda/ commons at Madison Centre.  Image: madisoncentre.com

Madison Centre, a 36-floor office + retail building with numerous features has opened at the southeast corner of Madison Street and 5th Avenue. Plans for this building were sidelined for 10 years during the economic downturn, but recently Schnitzer West, the real estate developers for this property decided to move ahead. They received comprehensive focus group feedback before proceeding to create a building striving to serve their tenants’ varying needs for collaboration, connectivity, and privacy, with relaxed amenities. The end goal was to increase everyone’s productivity and efficiency.  In essence, a “next-generation workplace”.  It’s LEED-certified and has an excellent walking score of 98, being centrally-located in the downtown Seattle core, near the downtown Central Library.

A suspended spiral staircase leads up to this 3-story high rotunda and commons area at Madison Centre. Image: NBBJ architects

FEATURES OF THE MADISON CENTRE:

  • Every floor has floor-to-ceiling windows, including the 3-story rotunda and commons area via a spiral, suspended staircase, accessed from the street
  • In the Gathering Place/Rotunda (i.e. Lobby)
    – Fireplace and its towering pillar, from a stone quarry in Minnesota
    – A suspended spiral staircase that leads up to 3-story glass rotunda area and commons
    – Exposed wood slats in rotunda, adjustable for natural light
    – A 5,000-plant Green Wall to improve air quality, reduce noise, and ease stress
    – Extremely fast elevators (from ground floor to roof in about 24 seconds
    – Premier coffee shop on NW corner of rotunda
    – 5-star concierge service
  • Rooms & Work Spaces
    – Site-Wide Connectivity:  Wi-Fi is everywhere, so tenants can work anywhere in the building.
    – Fireside Lounge
    – Common work spaces (both individual and team) and lounge areas off lobby
    – Cafeteria for tenants
    – Library
    – Private quieter rooms available for reservation
    – Multiple, shared conference areas: boardroom (elegantly furnished, fully equipped), other spaces with adjustable space
    – WA Athletic Club-run fitness center (5,000 SF) for tenants
    – Wellness Center (for health services, such as flu shots, etc.)
    – Conference Center with adjoining catering kitchen (12 to 130 people)
    – Able to control energy usage, lighting levels and temperature from anywhere
  • Other Spaces
    – a 480-stall Garage and Bike Storage with abundant security cameras. There is also showers and a locker room for those who pedal to work.
    – Rooftop deck with 15-foot glass walls to minimize wind. Lounging areas and green space are part of this deck.

Madison Centre is currently at 30% capacity, having newly opened last week, and tours are available.

Madison Centre’s rooftop deck.   Image: madisoncentre.com


Love Belltown?

Now’s your chance to get involved in your community and help make a difference!

This Wednesday, October 25th, there will be a very special Belltownhall meeting where you can meet Seattle’s Mayoral candidates, Seattle’s City Council members, and the City Attorney.

They will be here, in Belltown to listen to US, so let’s get involved and make the most of this opportunity for the neighborhood and for the city as a whole!

Really want to get involved in this awesome event? There’s still time to help by volunteering!

The folks at Project Belltown can use some extra help before the event and on the day, itself too!

If you want to help on Wednesday the 25th, email Evan Clifthorne with Project Belltown at evan@projectbelltown.com

Some ways you can help ahead of time:

  • Do you live here? Is there a poster in your building?  Can you put one in another building that your friend(s) live in?
  • Do you know 5 – 10 people who love Belltown?  Will you call and/or text them and specifically request that they come on Wednesday?
  • Have you reserved your tickets yet?  Did you say “going” on Facebook yet?
  • Do you use Facebook?  Will you share the event on your page?  Will you go to the event page and “invite” more of your friends?
  • Do you know of lists of people that can spread the word?  Will you ask them to help us?
  • Do you manage a Belltown community email list of any kind?  Have you told them about this opportunity?
  • Do you know someone that loves Belltown as much as you do?  Email, text, call however you can contact them, let them know you’re going and ask them to go too!

 


Here’s a little bit more info on the event from Project Belltown –

Durkan, Moon, & 2017 candidates to join #belltownhall on October 25th

Who:       Mayor, City Council, City Attorney, and YOU!
What:     Candidate One-on-One Interviews, Civic Tradeshow, Live Music, Artists, and BEER.
Where:   Block 41 event space, 115 Bell Street
When:    Wednesday October 25th at 6:00PM

Why:      Join us at #belltownhall to meet the candidates for Seattle’s Mayor, City Council at-large, and City Attorney. We will be talking about all things Belltown and Seattle, including affordable housing, arts and culture, public safety, transportation, open space, and so much more.

Hosts:    Project Belltown, with support from the Belltown Community Council, Belltown Business Association, The Stranger, Tune, Block 41, Makers, Pyramid Brewing, NW Polite Society, Live Nation, Growing Vine Street, and Friends of Historic Belltown.

Bonus:    We are launching the 2nd & Belltown Pale Ale (available at the event and in bars and restaurants throughout Belltown afterward) and will be showcasing food from several iconic Belltown restaurants.

Track on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram using #belltownhall.

Tickets are FREE but space is limited.

Get your spot and find us online @ProjectBelltown

Contact: Evan Clifthorne
Telephone206-486-6558
E-mail: evan@projectbelltown.com
Websitegoo.gl/aJ8UDd

Let’s all show up for Belltown and for Seattle by getting out, getting educated and getting heard!

Construction will begin next March to limit transit service along the First Avenue corridor linking Pioneer Square to the Belltown neighborhood north of Downtown. However, Metropolitan King County Councilmember Jeanne Kohl-Welles today made sure the rapidly growing Northwest Belltown neighborhood will continue to have some bus service through the heart of the community.

“My goal is to ensure that this growing corridor, which includes seniors, persons with disabilities, people working in the area, and visitors, do not lose service,” said Kohl-Welles, whose district includes Belltown. “If we had not taken these steps today, a densely populated area with steep hills that runs from the waterfront up to Third Avenue, would see its transit service disappear in March 2018.”

One of the adopted Metro Transit service changes approved today by the Council is the March 2018 elimination of Route 99, which travels from Pioneer Square into Belltown along First Avenue and down the hill to Elliot and Broad Streets. Construction along the waterfront, combined with the City of Seattle’s Center City Connector Streetcar utility relocation and construction project in Pioneer Square, prompted Metro to end the bus route.

Kohl-Welles’ amendment adopted today ensures that residents living in the northwest Belltown corridor will not be without transit service during the construction taking place in their neighborhood. She worked with Metro to add stops to Route 29 along First Avenue at Wall Street in the northbound and southbound directions and is working on having a stop added at First and Broad.

Kohl-Welles said that Metro will continue to work to ensure that transit is part of the future of a waterfront that will be revamped with the opening of the tunnel and the removal of the Alaskan Way Viaduct. The Council also adopted today a motion introduced by Kohl-Welles calling for Metro to develop a long-term waterfront transit strategy so residents, workers, and visitors will have viable access to and from Seattle’s newly renovated waterfront corridor as well as to northwest Belltown.

Syndicated from KingCounty.gov. Photo source.

By Chris Daniels

The City of Seattle may need to float a bond to pay for a KeyArena transportation fund to fulfill a $660 million proposal to renovate the site.

That was one of the key questions raised during a lengthy review of the tentative agreement, between the Oak View Group (OVG) and City of Seattle.

OVG agreed on the deal with Seattle’s Office of Economic Development to build a $600 million arena at the current KeyArena site last week. It still needs Seattle City Council approval to proceed.

The agreement, called a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), also lays out $20 million for a community fund and a $40 million transportation fund. OVG has agreed to pay for it all with private money.

But on Monday, upon questioning from Seattle City Councilmember Rob Johnson, the key negotiators mentioned a wrinkle: Seattle may have to bond against the fund.

City Budget Director Ben Noble acknowledged the MOU only calls for OVG to make payments of roughly $1 million a year over 39 years.

“We could, as a city, choose to bond against that,” Noble said. “So current present value basis, it’s 20 million dollars.”

Transportation questions ruled the long briefing. However, the council is expected to drill down on the financing as well.

OVG has offered to cover cost overruns and displacement bills for current tenants. It has also agreed to spend more than $168 million in capital improvement costs to vest two extensions at the site.

OVG believes it can open in the building in September of 2020.  That timeline works for a potential NHL franchise to call Seattle home.

Council chambers were packed with mostly supportive people, including groups who operate out of Seattle Center. Pottery Northwest, in particular, was initially worried about the development. However, their Executive Director James Lobb told the council he’d been encouraged by the discussions with OVG.  Pottery Northwest’s building was slated to be torn down in the arena development. However, OVG has agreed to temporarily relocate the business during construction and put it back in its historic building.

Only a pair of people testified in support of the SoDo Arena project, which, technically, has an agreement with the city that expires in December.

The council is slated to have at least three more meetings on the topic — October 10 and November 16.  The Council could vote on the MOU as early as December 4 or after the SoDo deal expires.

OVG’s Lance Lopes issued a statement after the meeting, expressing optimism.

“We applaud the City of Seattle for its open, collaborative and transparent approach to determining an exciting future for the New Arena at Seattle Center. Today’s meeting in City Council chambers reaffirmed our belief in the broad support for this project as evidenced by the strong turnout. Our team at OVG has been building arenas in communities around the world for nearly 40 years. We’ve seen a lot over four decades – and learned a lot too. We remain laser focused on our project and our partnership with the community, the Uptown, South Lake Union, Queen Anne and Belltown neighborhoods, and the City of Seattle. We will continue to aggressively pursue an NHL franchise, the return of the NBA, and through our close collaboration with Live Nation, make the New Arena at Seattle Center a globally-relevant live music destination.

“The path we’re on with the City, the community and each of our partners is the path we all want for Seattle: A future with a vibrant new arena that’s home to professional hockey, basketball and the biggest concerts and live events on earth. And today we’re one step closer to making that future a reality.”

Syndicated from King5.com

By Callie Little

It’s a treasure hidden in plain sight: the Belltown Corridor, an alleyway turned permanent installation, accessible from Second Avenue between Lenora and Blanchard. The block-long display of eight murals, created by artists from Seattle and from as far away as the Netherlands, is tucked behind the brand-new arcade bar Jupiter (Belltown, 2126 Second Ave.).

“I really wanted to bring artists from outside Seattle as a way to open [it] up to the rest of the art world,” says longtime local artist and Jupiter co-owner Joe Nix.

He joined forces with Pioneer Square’s Treason Gallery to reach out to artists and invite them to participate. “As a city, we need to embrace artists as much as possible. Without artists and musicians and the cultural side, what’s the point in all these buildings being built, and [what] would be the draw for all these people moving here?”

Syndicated from SeattleMag.com, photo credits: Hayley Young